- The Washington Times
Monday, March 20, 2017

ANALYSIS/OPINION:

Chelsea Clinton was named to the board of Expedia — you know, because all of her experience in the technology and cybersecurity field.

In her newly named position, Mrs. Clinton will get $45,000 a year in cash, plus $250,000 a year in stock vesting over three years. What Mrs. Clinton’s responsibilities will be at the online travel-booking company is unclear — the company’s financial filings don’t detail.


Expedia’s chairman, billionaire Barry Diller, is a longtime Clinton ally and prolific fundraiser for the political family. During the 2016 presidential campaign, Mr. Diller and his wife Diane von Furstenberg hosted a “Conversation and Dinner with Hillary Clinton,” with tickets priced at $100,000 per couple.

Mr. Diller has collected 54 percent of Expedia’s voting shares, so he’s single-handedly able to alter its board from 13 to 14 people to accommodate the younger Clinton. And he’s done it before.

Mr. Diller is also chairman of IAC Interactive, and invited Chelsea to sit on its board four years ago. In that position, Mrs. Clinton earns $50,000 in cash a year, and $249,936 in stock.

Chelsea started her career working for management consulting firm McKinsey & Company and investment firm Avenue Capital Group. She ditched those jobs for a cozy $600,000 a year gig reporting for NBC News, where she conducted hard-hitting interviews with the likes of Geico’s gecko.

Since then she’s helped with her mom’s presidential campaign and sits on the board of the School of American Ballet. Celebrity Net Worth puts her net worth at about $15 million.

It’s been reported that Mrs. Clinton is now eyeing her own run in politics. She’s releasing a children’s propaganda book “She Persisted” that will “tell the stories of 13 women who overcame immense opposition to achieve their goals,” Entertainment Weekly wrote.

Among the women are liberal icon Sonya Sotomayor, and a “surprise” cameo by an unnamed women — we can only guess who.

Here’s to Mrs. Clinton taking advantage of her namesake. It would almost be unnatural for her not to.


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