- The Washington Times
Monday, January 16, 2017

Prominent conservative activist Alveda King, the niece of civil rights leader Martin Luther King Jr., revealed Monday that she cast a vote for President-elect Donald Trump.

Ms. King, a former Georgia state representative who now serves as director for Civil Rights for the Unborn and Gospel of Life Ministries, told American Thinker that she’s been praying for Mr. Trump and his adversaries to unite and work together.


“I pray that all polar opposites learn to Agape Love, live and work together as brothers and sisters — or perish as fools,” she said. “While I voted for Mr. Trump, my confidence remains in God, for life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness. Prayers for President-elect Trump, Congressman Lewis, and everyone including leaders.”


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Ms. King, 65, made similar comments following Mr. Trump’s Election Day victory, saying she hoped the new president would bring racial healing to the country.

“I’m born into a family of preachers,” she told Fox Business Nov. 15. “So I want Mr. Trump to remember that many people who voted for him took a long time praying for him. And if he can take some of that divine guidance, that’s going to help him out. We do need unity, and from my perspective as a minister myself, God has not forgotten America.

“So if Mr. Trump can remember that, I believe that he can take some positive steps towards unity,” she said.

Her comments Monday come after civil rights icon Rep. John Lewis, who led the 1965 “Bloody Sunday” march in Selma, Alabama, said Mr. Trump would be an “illegitimate president” and vowed to join a boycott of the inauguration. Mr. Trump responded via Twitter, saying the Georgia Democrat is “all talk, talk, talk ― no action.”

Ms. King said Monday on “Fox & Friends” that she admires Mr. Lewis’ “legendary legacy” of civil rights and believes he can help America by working with the president.

“Mr. Trump, I voted for him, I understood what he meant when he says let’s roll up our sleeves together, and we can do that,” she said.


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