The Washington Times Online Edition
Select a category: 

MILLER: Obama’s blind spot

Big-government policies are on trial in this election

Mugshot

**FILE** President Obama speaks June 8, 2012, at the White House about the economy. (Associated Press)

President Obama has a blind spot when it comes to understanding the will of the American people. The biggest legislative achievements of his first term - Obamacare and the so-called stimulus - were wildly unpopular. The public realizes these laws haven’t made health care affordable nor have they produced any economic growth. Mr. Obama doesn’t care.

As part of his billion-dollar re-election blitz, Mr. Obama hit six fundraisers in Baltimore and Philadelphia on Tuesday to push for more of the same. “The good news is that the American people generally agree with our vision. I mean, if you just put in front of them issue after issue and you present the Democratic approach and the Republican approach, we win,” he told supporters at a posh Owings Mills, Md., home that’s equipped with its own indoor golf range.

“The other side feels that it’s enough for them to just sit back and say things aren’t as good as they should be, and it’s Obama’s fault. I mean, you can pretty much put their campaign on a Tweet and have some characters to spare.” He went on to say that voters want higher taxes (on small businesses) and more stimulus spending for local and state governments.

Mitt Romney, the Republican presidential candidate, spoke at Con-Air Industries in Orlando on Tuesday. “The president is so out of touch with the needs of the American people and so out of touch with the power of free enterprise and economic freedom that he doesn’t understand how his policies have hurt the American people,” he said to cheers and applause. “I know what we can do if we finally balance our budget and rein in the size of the federal government.”

A Gallup poll this week shows Mr. Obama’s message is having the opposite effect. Since the election, he has lost 6 percent of the white vote (down from 44 to 38 percent) and 4 percent of black voters (91 to 87 percent). As whites make up three-quarters of the electorate, the polling company concludes that Mr. Obama could mathematically lose even if he gained back all of his black support. He is also losing white youth, women and postgraduates, who were among his strongest backers in 2008. He’s lost 9 points among 18- to 29-year-olds, with only 43 percent now likely to vote for him.

While the president touts keeping Obamacare as a reason to re-elect him, the staffing company Jackson Healthcare surveyed physicians. Overall, the health care law received a mean grade of “D” from these docs. Seventy percent of the doctors said the law will not control costs, 67 percent said it will not improve the doctor-patient relationship and a majority of 55 percent said it should be repealed. That’s a failure.

Mr. Obama is either unwilling or unable to understand that Americans do not want his tax-and-spend, big-government policies. If he doesn’t take the blinders off soon, he won’t find his way back to 1600 Pennsylvania Ave. next January.

Emily Miller is a senior editor for the Opinion pages at The Washington Times.

About the Author

Emily Miller

Emily Miller is senior editor of opinion for The Washington Times. She is the author of “Emily Gets Her Gun … But Obama Wants to Take Yours” (Regnery 2013). Miller won the 2012 Clark Mollenhoff Award for Investigative Reporting from the Institute on Political Journalism.

Comments
blog comments powered by Disqus
All site contents © Copyright 2014 The Washington Times, LLC
Jobs | About | Customer Service | Terms | Privacy